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Aurora reverses itself on pot hospitality measure when second vote comes up short

Aurora appeared to extinguish the idea this week of being the among the first cities in Colorado to allow people to light up a joint in smoking lounges, tasting rooms and rolling weed buses, with the City Council narrowly rejecting new pot hospitality rules it had embraced just three weeks earlier. The measure went down Monday night on a 5-5 tie, which by city rules means an ordinance fails. Mayor Mike Coffman, who is only allowed to vote to create or break a tie, cast the tying vote. Due to the tie, it must go before the council a third time — Sept. 27 — giving it one last opportunity to pass should any council member change their mind. Councilwoman Marsha Berzins was the flip vote on Monday, having initially supported the measure Aug. 23 when it passed 6-3. Read the rest of this story on...

Cheap or free fares? RTD should take “urgent” action to lure riders back, report says.

Commuters returning to their workplaces as the pandemic eases are clogging Denver-area highways, but they aren’t yet boarding buses and trains in droves. That emerging dynamic has prompted an outside review panel to call for the Regional Transportation District to act boldly: Use some of its federal relief money to slash regular fares temporarily and streamline its monthly passes to make them easier to get. The plea underscores that RTD is in a fight to lure riders back against changing work patterns, its own budget constraints and, most of all, time. While RTD leaders point to gradual ridership growth this year as an encouraging sign, the most recent monthly ridership report from May shows 58% fewer riders boarded its buses, trains and other services during that month than in May 2019. Re...

New trouble for U.S. infrastructure talks as pressure mounts

WASHINGTON — Senators were running into new problems Monday as they raced to seal a bipartisan infrastructure deal with pressure mounting on all sides to show progress on President Joe Biden’s top priority. Heading into a make-or-break week, serious roadblocks remain. One dispute is over how much money should go to public transit. But spending on highways, water projects, broadband and others areas remains unresolved, too, as is whether to take unspent COVID-19 relief funds to help pay for the infrastructure. Democrats and the White House sent a fresh “global” offer to resolve remaining issues, but it was rebuffed early Monday by Republicans as “discouraging” — a setback for a hoped-for afternoon deal. Read the rest of this story on TheKnow.DenverPost.com.

Colorado’s legislative session is wrapping up. Here’s what lawmakers are passing.

Published: Jun 2, 2021, 11:57 am • Updated: Jun 2, 2021, 12:03 pm By Saja Hindi, Alex Burness Bills live and die in quick succession in the final days of the Colorado legislative session, which must end by 11:59 p.m. June 12. Here’s a quick glance at some of the remaining major bills, where they stand and what’s next for them. The following list will be updated as lawmakers take votes. Public-private insurance plan (HB21-1232) Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Marijuana-themed license plates are up for auction in Colorado

Published: Apr 6, 2021, 10:49 am • Updated: Apr 6, 2021, 10:51 am By Jake Shapiro If you wanted your high-country license plate to be even “higher,” now is your chance. Colorado motorists can buy the rights to marijuana-themed plates. The Colorado Disability Funding Committee is conducting a license plate auction that ends April 20. Some of the plates are “HEMP,” “GANJA,” “GREEN,” “BONG,” “HASH,” “INDICA” and “TEGRIDY.” Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Recreational marijuana laws may boost traffic deaths, studies say

Published: Jun 22, 2020, 11:45 am • Updated: Jun 22, 2020, 11:45 am By Associated Press By LINDSEY TANNER | The Associated Press Laws legalizing recreational marijuana may lead to more traffic deaths, two new studies suggest, although questions remain about how they might influence driving habits. Previous research has had mixed results and the new studies, published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine, can’t prove that the traffic death increases they found were caused by marijuana use. Read the rest of this story on MercuryNews.com.

Why cannabis sponsors the cleanup of more Colorado highway miles than any other industry

Cannabis companies are the leading sponsors of Colorado highways, accounting for cleanup on two-thirds of the roads maintained by Clean Colorado — a program the industry has leveraged as a loophole in the state’s strict limits on marijuana advertising. Currently, 51 cannabis dispensaries, cultivators, manufacturers and edible producers sponsor roadways throughout the state, according to data from the Adopt a Highway Maintenance Corporation. Though they represent less than half of all organizations that participate in the Clean Colorado program, those cannabis firms’ reach spans about 198 miles, or 66% of the roads actively sponsored. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.