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This weed vape pen may be the only one you’ll ever want, but not the only one you’ll ever need

Editor’s note: Each week in Staff Favorites, we offer our opinions on the best that Colorado has to offer for dining, shopping, entertainment, outdoor activities and more. (We’ll also let you in on some hidden gems). Of all the myriad ways to consume cannabis, my favorite is smoking a vape pen. It wasn’t always. As someone who just moved to Colorado in late 2019, I didn’t have a robust selection of products to choose from in my prior years as a recreational smoker. And while I once thought I’d never grow out of the nostalgia of loading a bowl of flower, vaporizers give me the consistent experience I’m looking for without the need for a lighter or other equipment. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Keef Brands launches a cannabinoid-infused water lineup

In 2010, Erik Knutson set out to create drinkable cannabis, beginning with an early concoction of “Keef Cola.” His official taste-tester? His 85-year-old grandmother, Dee. “Because if an 85-year-old woman who’s never smoked cannabis in her life loves it, then they might just be onto something,” Denver-based beverage company Keef Brands writes on its website. More than a decade later, the cannabis brand has set out on a new mission, one that incorporates minor cannabinoids and water. The new Life H2O line takes an overall wellness approach in addition to, well, getting high. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Marijuana regulation bill overwhelmingly passes in Colorado House

The Colorado House of Representatives passed the state’s most substantial marijuana regulation policy since legalization on Thursday, intending to crack down on youth access to high-potency THC products and tighten rules for the medical marijuana market. HB21-1317 passed overwhelmingly, 56-8, and moves on to the state Senate, where it is also expected to pass. The bill is a product of months of negotiations led by House Speaker Alec Garnett, and calls for the Colorado School of Public Health to analyze existing research “related to the physical and mental health effects of high-potency THC marijuana and concentrates.” The analysis could inform new restrictions in the coming years. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Colorado may see its biggest overhaul of marijuana laws since recreational legalization

They don’t make cannabis products like they used to, and there’s an increasing number of Colorado lawmakers who think that’s problematic. As recently as 2014, the vast majority of medical and recreational cannabis sold in Colorado was flower and only 11% was the high-potency concentrates consumed through dab rigs or vape pens. By 2019, concentrates took up a third of the market and flower was below 50%. With the rising popularity of high-THC concentrates, which are several times more potent than flower and edibles, come worries among deep-pocketed political groups and their statehouse allies that teenagers have too much access to it without enough knowledge of the effects. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

A Colorado Democrat wants to cap THC levels in marijuana products at 15%

The lone medical doctor in the Colorado legislature is looking to cut back the THC content on the most potent cannabis products, among other changes that would have major impacts on the state’s cannabis industry. State Rep. Yadira Caraveo, a pediatrician and Thornton Democrat, said she is still revising the bill she plans to introduce this month, but one of the main provisions would ban legal marijuana products above 15% THC — the psychoactive compound responsible for the marijuana high. The ban would apply to flower and edibles. THC in flower products can top off close to 30%, while concentrates generally run at 70-80%. “Even if it’s the start of a conversation, I think it’s an important conversation,” Caraveo told The Denver Post on Thursday. “We led the way with legalization, but it doe...

Cannabis giant Curaleaf to acquire Colorado edibles maker BlueKudu

A Denver-based edibles manufacturer is being scooped up by a multi-state marijuana company in one of the year’s first local business acquisitions. Courtesy Blue KuduCannabis giant Curaleaf is set to acquire BlueKudu, the Denver-based maker of edible marijuana products, including these infused gummies Cannabis giant Curaleaf is set to acquire BlueKudu, which is known for its infused chocolates and gummies, according to an announcement Monday. Curaleaf, based in Wakefield, Mass., currently operates dispensaries, cultivations and processing plants in 14 states; this move marks its first foray into the Colorado market. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Perlmutter, House co-sponsors push Senate for swift action on marijuana banking bill

U.S. Rep. Ed Perlmutter and three other congressmen who’ve been pushing to give cannabis businesses access to banking services expressed hope Tuesday their bill would move through the Senate soon. In a letter sent to Mike Crapo, chairman of the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs, the Arvada Democrat and Reps. Steve Stivers, R-Ohio, Denny Heck, D-Wash., and Warren Davidson, R-Ohio, addressed the chairman’s concerns about the Secure and Fair Enforcement (SAFE) Banking Act while urging him to take swift action. In his comments published Dec. 18, Crapo recommended adding public health and safety requirements to the legislation, such as requiring potency disclosures and a potential 2% THC limit on products before allowing banks to do business with cannabis companies, and rul...

Colorado lawmakers want to stop employers from firing people for using weed in their personal time

Published: Jan 14, 2020, 6:18 am • Updated: Jan 14, 2020, 6:19 am By Saja Hindi Two Colorado lawmakers want to pass a law to protect workers who use marijuana when they’re off the clock. House Rep. Jevon Melton, D-Aurora, has introduced a bill to prevent businesses from firing employees for partaking in legal activities on their own time — even if the activities are only legal under state and not federal law. To pass, though, the bill will likely require some compromise to address expected objections from the business community. Melton says the measure would correct an oversight in Colorado law. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Starting Jan. 1, Coloradans will have more options for consuming cannabis in public. But will we catch up to California?

Published: Dec 27, 2019, 6:06 am • Updated: Dec 27, 2019, 6:08 am By John Wenzel, The Know From eye-level, Tetra Lounge looks like an upscale coffee shop rolled into a nightclub. Brick walls, painted white, box in DJ booths and a bar, while attractive glass cases and furniture dot the 2,000-square-foot space at 3039 Walnut St. in the River North Art District. But look down and you’re suddenly in a weed dealer’s apartment from the black-market era of cannabis: plush but worn couches, video game controllers, scattered bits of bright-green leaves, and a friendly, roaming Rottweiler named Kena. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.