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Medical marijuana laws in Colorado will be more strict starting Jan. 1. Here’s how.

Colorado will impose stricter rules for the purchase of medical marijuana starting Jan. 1 following several months of deliberation over how to execute a new state law meant largely to limit young people’s access to and abuse of high-potency THC products. The post Medical marijuana laws in Colorado will be more strict starting Jan. 1. Here’s how. appeared first on The Cannabist.

Charlie Baker again pushes stoned driving bill with drugged driving causalities on the rise

Gov. Charlie Baker, frustrated by lawmakers’ inaction more than five years after the legalization of recreational pot, is making a second attempt to cut down on stoned driving. The post Charlie Baker again pushes stoned driving bill with drugged driving causalities on the rise appeared first on The Cannabist.

Bills filed in state House, Senate would legalize medical marijuana insurance coverage

Medical marijuana, used to treat everything from chronic pain to Parkinson’s Disease to PTSD, is still not covered by medical insurance, a cost some say is prohibitively expensive to patients who rely on the drug. The post Bills filed in state House, Senate would legalize medical marijuana insurance coverage appeared first on The Cannabist.

Colorado dispensary offering 1-cent joint deal to voters until Election Day

Election Day is Nov. 2, and while you should vote to have a say in your local democracy, it never hurts to have an incentive. Native Roots Cannabis Co. is offering 1-cent joints to any customer who comes in with an “I Voted” sticker. The deal, which runs through Election Day, is good at any of the company’s 20 dispensaries in Colorado; no additional purchase is necessary. There’s a limit of one joint per customer. While I have you, check out The Denver Post’s comprehensive voter guide to local elections and statewide issues before you go out and light up the ballot box. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Battle for Broomfield’s three marijuana retail licenses spurs accusations, lawsuit

A mad scramble is on in Broomfield to score a trio of coveted licenses to sell recreational marijuana, with 26 applicants jostling for a spot in a city that until now has banned all weed sales. One established cannabis company is crying foul, charging that the lottery system Broomfield will use this month to award the licenses is essentially rigged to raise the odds for some contenders — and the city is doing nothing about it. “They’re allowing various individuals to submit multiple applications into the lottery through various shell companies,” Jordan Factor, attorney for Terrapin Care Station, told The Denver Post. “We’re baffled.” Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Aurora reverses itself on pot hospitality measure when second vote comes up short

Aurora appeared to extinguish the idea this week of being the among the first cities in Colorado to allow people to light up a joint in smoking lounges, tasting rooms and rolling weed buses, with the City Council narrowly rejecting new pot hospitality rules it had embraced just three weeks earlier. The measure went down Monday night on a 5-5 tie, which by city rules means an ordinance fails. Mayor Mike Coffman, who is only allowed to vote to create or break a tie, cast the tying vote. Due to the tie, it must go before the council a third time — Sept. 27 — giving it one last opportunity to pass should any council member change their mind. Councilwoman Marsha Berzins was the flip vote on Monday, having initially supported the measure Aug. 23 when it passed 6-3. Read the rest of this story on...

New trouble for U.S. infrastructure talks as pressure mounts

WASHINGTON — Senators were running into new problems Monday as they raced to seal a bipartisan infrastructure deal with pressure mounting on all sides to show progress on President Joe Biden’s top priority. Heading into a make-or-break week, serious roadblocks remain. One dispute is over how much money should go to public transit. But spending on highways, water projects, broadband and others areas remains unresolved, too, as is whether to take unspent COVID-19 relief funds to help pay for the infrastructure. Democrats and the White House sent a fresh “global” offer to resolve remaining issues, but it was rebuffed early Monday by Republicans as “discouraging” — a setback for a hoped-for afternoon deal. Read the rest of this story on TheKnow.DenverPost.com.

Denver’s mayor proposes new arena as part of $450 million infrastructure bond proposal

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock’s plans for a $450 million infrastructure bonding package to put to voters includes a new, mid-size “state-of-the-art” arena. He made the announcement during his annual State of the City address, conducted virtually on Monday morning. He dedicated much of the speech to the topics of homelessness, criminal justice and post-pandemic resilience. The infrastructure package represented the most substantial spending proposal in the speech. A $450 million investment, he said, “will help create 7,500 good-paying jobs, $483 million in worker wages and benefits, and $1 billion in economic benefits. Read the rest of this story on TheKnow.DenverPost.com.

The Libertarian Party, born in Colorado 50 years ago, still seeks elusive mainstream acceptance

The United States’ third-largest political party — what its main founder considered “the last, best hope for freedom in America” — took root a half-century ago in a living room in Westminster. The TV flickered on, David Nolan would later recall, as the then-28-year-old advertising executive and his wife gathered in their duplex with three friends in August 1971. They listened, aghast, as Republican President Richard Nixon announced plans to intervene in the economy in once-unthinkable ways to deal with inflation and high unemployment. In that moment, the five who were among a growing movement of people skeptical of government interference in personal and economic lives decided they needed a new political home. Within months, the Libertarian Party was born. And in August, the national party...

Colorado’s legislative session is wrapping up. Here’s what lawmakers are passing.

Published: Jun 2, 2021, 11:57 am • Updated: Jun 2, 2021, 12:03 pm By Saja Hindi, Alex Burness Bills live and die in quick succession in the final days of the Colorado legislative session, which must end by 11:59 p.m. June 12. Here’s a quick glance at some of the remaining major bills, where they stand and what’s next for them. The following list will be updated as lawmakers take votes. Public-private insurance plan (HB21-1232) Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Marijuana regulation bill overwhelmingly passes in Colorado House

The Colorado House of Representatives passed the state’s most substantial marijuana regulation policy since legalization on Thursday, intending to crack down on youth access to high-potency THC products and tighten rules for the medical marijuana market. HB21-1317 passed overwhelmingly, 56-8, and moves on to the state Senate, where it is also expected to pass. The bill is a product of months of negotiations led by House Speaker Alec Garnett, and calls for the Colorado School of Public Health to analyze existing research “related to the physical and mental health effects of high-potency THC marijuana and concentrates.” The analysis could inform new restrictions in the coming years. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

California man stranded in Mexico after admitting marijuana use reunites with with family

Nearly two years after he told the truth about having once smoked pot – a bit of honesty that left him stranded in Mexico, separated from his family, and blocked from re-entering the United States – a Southern California man walked back into his home last month and surprised his children. Emily, 7, was napping in the living room, so it took her a moment to realize that the man waking her up was her father, Jose Palomar. She threw her arms around him and cried. He cried too. Next, he went upstairs in their Corona home to surprise 12-year-old April, who ran toward him and also started crying. Joshua, 14, was in the garage, playing video games, but he too sprung up for a hug. “He’s a little more grown up since I last saw him,” Palomar said. Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.

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