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Denver officials want to save struggling cannabis delivery businesses

Weed delivery has yet to catch on in Denver, but government officials are pushing dispensaries to drop their resistance to save the transporter businesses of marginalized entrepreneurs. “Delivery has not taken off in the way that we had hoped that it would,” said Molly Duplechian, Excise and Licenses Department director. “We’re hearing that they’re struggling.” At a marijuana industry check-in meeting on Tuesday, the department proposed a bill that would permanently limit store deliveries to licensed transporters owned by social-equity applicants. Stores wouldn’t be allowed to do their own delivery. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Colorado marijuana company to expand into Africa through Tanzanian medical clinics

A Colorado marijuana company with global ambitions aims to expand into Tanzania, with the goal of eventually breaking into the European market. Oak Creek’s Honest Marijuana Company, which specializes in organic marijuana, is partnering with a new chain of medical clinics in Tanzania to set up an African base for medical marijuana production and sales. While cannabis production is outlawed in the East African country, the plant is still cultivated, company Empower Africa reports. Should the Tanzanian government decide to ease its laws around medical marijuana in the future, it would follow a trend growing across the continent, with Lesotho, South Africa, and other nations permitting select cannabis ventures. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Budding business: Weed jobs success story in tight labor market

Some businesses have trimmed their hours, changed the way they serve customers, or hiked wages and sweetened benefits to entice applicants as the pandemic-influenced job market reshapes itself. Pot businesses are among those keeping a “now hiring” sign in the window, but for different reasons than the restaurants, hotels and retailers scrambling to get back to pre-pandemic staffing levels. The challenges that cannabis companies face in hiring differ, too — too many applications in some cases, striving to meet diversity and local job commitments and overcoming the stigma of what for decades was an illegal industry. Read the rest of this story on BostonHerald.com.

More Southern California employers no longer testing most job candidates for drugs

Getting a job these days doesn’t always involve a plastic bottle and a trip to the bathroom. With recreational marijuana use legal in California, and at least 17 other states and Washington D.C., some employers are making changes and will no longer require some job candidates to be screened for drugs and alcohol. “Instead, these employers focus on combating drug use in the workplace through enforcing their existing drug-free workplace policies and utilizing reasonable suspicion drug testing,” said Matthew Roberts, employment law counsel for the California Chamber of Commerce, via email. Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.

Colorado’s marijuana businesses can remain open during pandemic, but they say they’re still struggling

As the coronavirus fueled changes in regulation for Colorado’s cannabis industry, leaders at LivWell Enlightened Health knew they needed to make dramatic moves to keep the business and its workers thriving. And fast. On March 30, 18 company executives and department heads agreed to suspend their compensation for three months to avoid making cuts elsewhere, including personnel. The company employs 690 people between its cultivation sites, business administration and 18 dispensaries in Colorado and Oregon. Most are what Executive Director Dean Heizer calls “heartbeat” employees, namely, those on the front lines serving customers in marijuana dispensaries and working in its grow facilities sites to ensure there’s product to sell. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Colorado won’t stop employers from firing workers for using weed off the clock

Colorado legislators decided Wednesday not to advance a bill that aimed to protect employees from being fired for using marijuana in their personal time. The 10 members of the House Business Affairs and Labor Committee voted unanimously against the bill, HB 20-1089, after nearly three hours of testimony from people on each side. Though the bill would have done nothing to prohibit employers from administering drug tests, many committee members cited the lack of an adequate test to determine whether an employee is intoxicated in the moment — much like a breathalyzer does for alcohol — as a reason to table it. Others thought the proposed change to the law was too broad. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.