Cannabis Product and Services Reviews - Trusted leaves
Growing Elite Marijuana

immigration

California man stranded in Mexico after admitting marijuana use reunites with with family

Nearly two years after he told the truth about having once smoked pot – a bit of honesty that left him stranded in Mexico, separated from his family, and blocked from re-entering the United States – a Southern California man walked back into his home last month and surprised his children. Emily, 7, was napping in the living room, so it took her a moment to realize that the man waking her up was her father, Jose Palomar. She threw her arms around him and cried. He cried too. Next, he went upstairs in their Corona home to surprise 12-year-old April, who ran toward him and also started crying. Joshua, 14, was in the garage, playing video games, but he too sprung up for a hug. “He’s a little more grown up since I last saw him,” Palomar said. Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.

Working in Colorado’s cannabis industry could prevent you from becoming a U.S. citizen. A new bill in Washington could change that.

Earlier this year, Denver resident Oswaldo Barrientos was barred from becoming a U.S. citizen because of his work in Colorado’s legal cannabis industry, despite a perfectly clean record. But a bi-partisan bill introduced in Washington this week could make it possible for those like Barrientos to clear that final hurdle. Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Yuma, joined forces with an unlikely partner in Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Massachusetts, to introduce legislation that would remove participation in the legal cannabis industry from the list of activities that automatically bar naturalization. It comes months after Denver Mayor Michael Hancock pressed the Trump administration to rethink its citizenship policies, which issued guidance in April that anyone working in the marijuana industry — even in states...