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Medical marijuana laws in Colorado will be more strict starting Jan. 1. Here’s how.

Colorado will impose stricter rules for the purchase of medical marijuana starting Jan. 1 following several months of deliberation over how to execute a new state law meant largely to limit young people’s access to and abuse of high-potency THC products. The post Medical marijuana laws in Colorado will be more strict starting Jan. 1. Here’s how. appeared first on The Cannabist.

Charlie Baker again pushes stoned driving bill with drugged driving causalities on the rise

Gov. Charlie Baker, frustrated by lawmakers’ inaction more than five years after the legalization of recreational pot, is making a second attempt to cut down on stoned driving. The post Charlie Baker again pushes stoned driving bill with drugged driving causalities on the rise appeared first on The Cannabist.

Bills filed in state House, Senate would legalize medical marijuana insurance coverage

Medical marijuana, used to treat everything from chronic pain to Parkinson’s Disease to PTSD, is still not covered by medical insurance, a cost some say is prohibitively expensive to patients who rely on the drug. The post Bills filed in state House, Senate would legalize medical marijuana insurance coverage appeared first on The Cannabist.

Budding business: Weed jobs success story in tight labor market

Some businesses have trimmed their hours, changed the way they serve customers, or hiked wages and sweetened benefits to entice applicants as the pandemic-influenced job market reshapes itself. Pot businesses are among those keeping a “now hiring” sign in the window, but for different reasons than the restaurants, hotels and retailers scrambling to get back to pre-pandemic staffing levels. The challenges that cannabis companies face in hiring differ, too — too many applications in some cases, striving to meet diversity and local job commitments and overcoming the stigma of what for decades was an illegal industry. Read the rest of this story on BostonHerald.com.

Battle for Broomfield’s three marijuana retail licenses spurs accusations, lawsuit

A mad scramble is on in Broomfield to score a trio of coveted licenses to sell recreational marijuana, with 26 applicants jostling for a spot in a city that until now has banned all weed sales. One established cannabis company is crying foul, charging that the lottery system Broomfield will use this month to award the licenses is essentially rigged to raise the odds for some contenders — and the city is doing nothing about it. “They’re allowing various individuals to submit multiple applications into the lottery through various shell companies,” Jordan Factor, attorney for Terrapin Care Station, told The Denver Post. “We’re baffled.” Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Aurora reverses itself on pot hospitality measure when second vote comes up short

Aurora appeared to extinguish the idea this week of being the among the first cities in Colorado to allow people to light up a joint in smoking lounges, tasting rooms and rolling weed buses, with the City Council narrowly rejecting new pot hospitality rules it had embraced just three weeks earlier. The measure went down Monday night on a 5-5 tie, which by city rules means an ordinance fails. Mayor Mike Coffman, who is only allowed to vote to create or break a tie, cast the tying vote. Due to the tie, it must go before the council a third time — Sept. 27 — giving it one last opportunity to pass should any council member change their mind. Councilwoman Marsha Berzins was the flip vote on Monday, having initially supported the measure Aug. 23 when it passed 6-3. Read the rest of this story on...

Unvaccinated staff eyed in federal investigation of Mesa County nursing home cases, deaths

By Jason Dearen and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, The Associated Press WASHINGTON — Lagging vaccination rates among nursing home staff are being linked to a national increase in COVID-19 infections and deaths at senior facilities, and are at the center of a federal investigation in a hard-hit Colorado location where disease detectives found many workers were not inoculated. The investigation by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of facilities in the Grand Junction area raises concerns among public health doctors that successes in protecting vulnerable elders with vaccines could be in peril as the more aggressive delta variant spreads across the country. Read the rest of this story on TheKnow.DenverPost.com.

More Southern California employers no longer testing most job candidates for drugs

Getting a job these days doesn’t always involve a plastic bottle and a trip to the bathroom. With recreational marijuana use legal in California, and at least 17 other states and Washington D.C., some employers are making changes and will no longer require some job candidates to be screened for drugs and alcohol. “Instead, these employers focus on combating drug use in the workplace through enforcing their existing drug-free workplace policies and utilizing reasonable suspicion drug testing,” said Matthew Roberts, employment law counsel for the California Chamber of Commerce, via email. Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.

Boston pot supermarket given green light, may open this week

Published: Apr 26, 2021, 6:37 pm • Updated: Apr 26, 2021, 6:39 pm By Meghan Ottolini, Joe Dwinell One of the country’s biggest legal marijuana companies is ready to open a pot supermarket in downtown Boston — possibly as soon as later this week, the Herald has learned. Ascend is preparing a “soft opening” with a target date of Thursday for a 16,000-square-foot dispensary on Friend Street across from North Station and TD Garden. The Massachusetts Cannabis Control Commission has backed the shop. It will be the city’s biggest dispensary and wary West End neighbors say they’ll be keeping an eye on how it all rolls out. Read the rest of this story on BostonHerald.com.

Colorado may see its biggest overhaul of marijuana laws since recreational legalization

They don’t make cannabis products like they used to, and there’s an increasing number of Colorado lawmakers who think that’s problematic. As recently as 2014, the vast majority of medical and recreational cannabis sold in Colorado was flower and only 11% was the high-potency concentrates consumed through dab rigs or vape pens. By 2019, concentrates took up a third of the market and flower was below 50%. With the rising popularity of high-THC concentrates, which are several times more potent than flower and edibles, come worries among deep-pocketed political groups and their statehouse allies that teenagers have too much access to it without enough knowledge of the effects. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

On Charlotte Figi Day, family will celebrate the Colorado girl who helped legitimize medical marijuana

Paige Figi hasn’t spoken publicly about her daughter Charlotte in the 10 months since the teenager’s passing. It’s an unusual, if welcome, change of pace considering the Colorado Springs duo spent nearly a decade in the spotlight leading a crusade for medicinal marijuana that helped change both laws and lives. Charlotte, whose battle with Dravet syndrome and subsequent treatment popularized the use of cannabidiol, or CBD, died last April after contracting what the family suspects was COVID-19. The 13-year-old later was cremated, Figi said, but the pandemic prevented her parents from making any funeral plans. That is, until now. On April 7 — officially dubbed Charlotte Figi Day in Colorado — family, friends and fans are invited to join a virtual celebration of life called Rock the RoC. Host...

A Colorado Democrat wants to cap THC levels in marijuana products at 15%

The lone medical doctor in the Colorado legislature is looking to cut back the THC content on the most potent cannabis products, among other changes that would have major impacts on the state’s cannabis industry. State Rep. Yadira Caraveo, a pediatrician and Thornton Democrat, said she is still revising the bill she plans to introduce this month, but one of the main provisions would ban legal marijuana products above 15% THC — the psychoactive compound responsible for the marijuana high. The ban would apply to flower and edibles. THC in flower products can top off close to 30%, while concentrates generally run at 70-80%. “Even if it’s the start of a conversation, I think it’s an important conversation,” Caraveo told The Denver Post on Thursday. “We led the way with legalization, but it doe...

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