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Steve Fox, who helped legalize marijuana in Colorado, has died at 53

One of the leaders of Colorado’s first-in-the-nation recreational marijuana legalization movement, Steve Fox, has died at the age of 53. Fox was the lead drafter of Colorado Amendment 64, which passed in 2012 with a little more than 55% of the vote, and he also lobbied for legal weed in the state capitol. “We are truly heartbroken to share news of the passing of our partner and dear friend Steve Fox,” wrote the cannabis law group Vicente Sederberg LLP, where Fox was a leader since 2010. Fox also served as a managing partner of VS Strategies since co-founding the group in 2013. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

On Charlotte Figi Day, family will celebrate the Colorado girl who helped legitimize medical marijuana

Paige Figi hasn’t spoken publicly about her daughter Charlotte in the 10 months since the teenager’s passing. It’s an unusual, if welcome, change of pace considering the Colorado Springs duo spent nearly a decade in the spotlight leading a crusade for medicinal marijuana that helped change both laws and lives. Charlotte, whose battle with Dravet syndrome and subsequent treatment popularized the use of cannabidiol, or CBD, died last April after contracting what the family suspects was COVID-19. The 13-year-old later was cremated, Figi said, but the pandemic prevented her parents from making any funeral plans. That is, until now. On April 7 — officially dubbed Charlotte Figi Day in Colorado — family, friends and fans are invited to join a virtual celebration of life called Rock the RoC. Host...

Cannabis industry may finally move past cash as Democrats look to loosen banking restrictions

Colorado’s cannabis industry has been forced to deal primarily in cash for years due to banking restrictions that pot advocates and banking lobbyists say put shops, growers and others at risk of theft. The industry is now cautiously optimistic this year that, with Democrats in power in Washington, its eight years of trying to lift those restrictions on banks and credit unions will pay off. Because marijuana remains an illicit drug under federal law — and banking the proceeds of illicit drug sales is a federal crime — credit unions and banks are limited in their ability to work with cannabis companies, and take risks when doing so. As a result, the large and growing marijuana industry still remains cash-only, seven years after legalization in Colorado. “We’ve got people who are still dealin...

November marijuana sales push Colorado’s industry to $2 billion annually for the first time

Colorado marijuana sales in November pushed the industry’s annual revenue to $2 billion for the first time. In November, dispensaries sold $175.1 million worth of products, according to figures released by the Department of Revenue on Tuesday. Recreational sales accounted for about $140.5 million, while medical sales accounted for nearly $34.7 million, the agency reported. While the total is down about 12% compared to the month prior, it was enough to help Colorado hit yet another financial milestone in an already banner year for cannabis. From January through November 2020, consumers purchased slightly more than $2 billion, the Department of Revenue reported. The previous year, dispensaries reached $1.75 billion in annual sales, a record at the time. Read the rest of this story on DenverP...

Colorado weed sales set to crush annual record, with another $200 million month in September

Weed enthusiasts purchased more than $206.4 million worth of Colorado-made marijuana products in September, as sales from a record-breaking year moderately cooled off. Recreational dispensaries sold $166,547,119 during the month, while medical dispensaries sold $39,941,149 for a combined $206,488,268 in revenue, according to data from the Colorado Department of Revenue. Sales decreased 5.5% compared to August, but are up 33% compared to September 2019 as marijuana experiences a banner year for sales despite the coronavirus pandemic. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Colorado governor to mass-pardon 2,700-plus marijuana convictions

Colorado Gov. Jared Polis plans to mass-pardon 2,732 convictions of low-level marijuana possession through an executive order Thursday after signing a bill earlier this year that gave him that authority. “This really catches Coloradans up with where the law is today,” he told The Denver Post. House Bill 1424, passed by the General Assembly earlier this year, included a provision that allows the governor to pardon those who have convictions on their criminal records for possessing up to 2 ounces of marijuana — the current legal limit for medical marijuana users. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Liquor stores, recreational dispensaries to close in Denver until mid-April

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock on Monday ordered residents to stay in their homes and announced that non-essential businesses such as liquor stores and recreational marijuana dispensaries would close across the city starting Tuesday. The closure will take effect at 5 p.m. Tuesday and continue through April 10. Restaurants and bars will still be able to sell alcohol, including wine, beer and cocktails, following an executive order from Gov. Jared Polis on Friday. Restaurants and bars offering food and drinks for takeout or delivery are considered essential businesses and will remain open for those services, Hancock clarified during his press conference on Monday. Even though liquor stores remain open alongside essential businesses in other states, in Denver, they will close. Read the rest of ...

Colorado’s first licensed cannabis R&D firm to study marijuana’s effect on Alzheimer’s disease

A Denver-based company hopes to be the state’s first to study the effects of marijuana on Alzheimer’s disease, thanks to a newly available research and development license in the city. MedPharm Holdings plans to apply for a Denver marijuana R&D license to test delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD) and other cannabinoids’ effects on Alzheimer’s and dementia patients. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, 5.8 million Americans have the disease, a degenerative brain disorder that affects a person’s memory and thinking skills. While there are drugs that help ease symptoms, they do not change the course of the disease. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Glendale plans to open Colorado’s first marijuana tasting room inside a replica jail cell

Patrons at the Smokin Gun dispensary in Glendale will be among the first in Colorado to have a place to socially smoke marijuana when the pot shop opens an onsite tasting room this spring. Smokin Gun, billed as a late-night dispensary and anti-Prohibition museum, is planning a tiny onsite tasting room called The Joint where customers can consume products they buy at the dispensary, including flights of different strains of flower, according to an announcement Wednesday. Because the dispensary has something of a Wild West theme, The Joint will resemble a jail cell. It’s expected to open on April 20. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Colorado lawmakers want to stop employers from firing people for using weed in their personal time

Published: Jan 14, 2020, 6:18 am • Updated: Jan 14, 2020, 6:19 am By Saja Hindi Two Colorado lawmakers want to pass a law to protect workers who use marijuana when they’re off the clock. House Rep. Jevon Melton, D-Aurora, has introduced a bill to prevent businesses from firing employees for partaking in legal activities on their own time — even if the activities are only legal under state and not federal law. To pass, though, the bill will likely require some compromise to address expected objections from the business community. Melton says the measure would correct an oversight in Colorado law. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

“The boom is over”: Colorado cannabis growers hope volatile wholesale market is stabilizing

Entrepreneurs who broke into Colorado’s cannabis industry at the ground level — the growers — have endured economic whiplash over the last two years as the market for wholesale flower experienced volatile swings in price. The average market rate slumped to a low of $759 per pound in 2018 after peaking at $2,007 per pound in early 2015. That rate has rebounded to $1,316 per pound this month, after five consecutive quarters on the rise, reaching the highest price in three years. Still, many anticipate the wholesale cost will remain relatively flat in 2020. Or at least they’re hoping it will. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Starting Jan. 1, Coloradans will have more options for consuming cannabis in public. But will we catch up to California?

Published: Dec 27, 2019, 6:06 am • Updated: Dec 27, 2019, 6:08 am By John Wenzel, The Know From eye-level, Tetra Lounge looks like an upscale coffee shop rolled into a nightclub. Brick walls, painted white, box in DJ booths and a bar, while attractive glass cases and furniture dot the 2,000-square-foot space at 3039 Walnut St. in the River North Art District. But look down and you’re suddenly in a weed dealer’s apartment from the black-market era of cannabis: plush but worn couches, video game controllers, scattered bits of bright-green leaves, and a friendly, roaming Rottweiler named Kena. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

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