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Fullerton hires part-time staffer to weed out unlicensed cannabis businesses

Looking to crack down on illegal cannabis businesses in the city, Fullerton is set to hire a new code enforcement officer whose job will focus solely on finding and shutting down unlicensed pot shops and other marijuana-related businesses. City Council members recently gave the green light for the city to launch a two-year pilot program, under which the officer will be employed part-time, focusing 28 hours per week on the job. Matt Foulkes, director of community and economic development in Fullerton, said the issue of unlicensed weed stores has been an “ongoing problem” in the city, albeit more mild compared to the numbers nearby cities have seen. Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.

Planet 13 hiring 250 ahead of cannabis superstore’s debut in Santa Ana

Published: Apr 13, 2021, 2:14 pm • Updated: Apr 13, 2021, 2:17 pm By Kevin Smith A Las Vegas cannabis dispensary is looking to hire 250 workers for a soon-to-be-completed superstore in Santa Ana as the company expands its operations amid a gradually improving COVID-19 economy. Planet 13 hopes to fill the Orange County positions by July. It also will be adding 40 cash registers and 80 additional employees at its Las Vegas store, boosting companywide staffing by 330. The 45,000-square-foot Santa Ana location at 3400 Warner Ave. will be called Planet 13 Orange County. Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.

Study: California’s licensed cannabis shops aren’t selling to minors

California’s licensed marijuana shops are doing an excellent job at preventing sales to minors, according to a first-of-its-kind study commissioned by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. That means the industry is living up to a key promise advocates made when voters legalized cannabis for adults 21 and older nearly five years ago. “Licensed marijuana retailers are clearly keen to follow the rules,” said Angela Eichelberger, a research scientist with the Insurance Institute who authored the report with University of Chicago and University of Minnesota experts. “They’re aware that the industry hasn’t won everybody over yet, and they don’t want to get shut down.” Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.

Report: California needs to better track and test drugged drivers

Nearly five years after California voters legalized cannabis, a new state report is recommending a series of changes to better track and test for drivers impaired by marijuana and other drugs. Those recommendations from the California Highway Patrol’s Impaired Driving Task Force are expected to trigger a series of new and revived bills in the state legislature over the coming months. The CHP report calls for the state to start collecting and publishing data on the number of drivers arrested or involved in accidents with cannabis and other drugs in their system. There’s currently no central collection point for such data, and no statewide standards for the few city or county agencies that gather such data on their own. Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.

Medical marijuana retail workers move to head of vaccine line, ahead of teachers

It was with a sense of accomplishment that young cannabis entrepreneur Jerred Kiloh scheduled his first COVID-19 vaccine appointment for Feb. 11 in San Francisco. Jerred Kiloh, owner of The Higher Path Collective dispensary in Sherman Oaks. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG) Kiloh, owner of the Higher Path Collective in Sherman Oaks and president of the United Cannabis Business Association, was one of the movers and shakers responsible for nudging medical marijuana retail workers toward the front of California’s vaccine eligibility line, before some educators, emergency workers and food and agriculture workers. Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.

Majoring in marijuana? That soon could be common as universities adapt to a growth industry.

Published: Feb 1, 2021, 11:52 am • Updated: Feb 1, 2021, 11:55 am By Brooke Staggs Want practical experience growing marijuana, but have no idea how to get a plant? Or just not comfortable growing cannabis at home? Try stinging nettle, which is a plant that’s distantly related to cannabis and has similar growth patterns. That’s just one of many workarounds Dana Milstein had to learn as she developed curriculum for UC Riverside’s new extension program focused on cannabis, which is the first program of its kind at a public university in California. Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.

This rapper and singer is using music to promote the cannabis business

When musicians make it big in the industry, one of the first things many do is quit their day jobs. But aspiring rapper and singer Robert Ellis IV, a Redlands native who now performs as Pullupnsplash, got into music industry to promote his day job in marketing and as an independent consultant for several dispensaries and cannabis brands. “Being in the cannabis industry we’re scrutinized, we don’t really have a way to fairly get our voice out. We’re very regulated as far as marketing, so I had to think outside the box and use music as my freedom of speech, and they can’t take that away,” Ellis said. Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.

Former Corona City Councilman Nolan accused of marijuana violations

Former Corona City Councilman Steve Nolan has been cited on suspicion of illegal cultivation of marijuana and possession of marijuana for sale, the Riverside County jail log shows. Nolan, a 58-year-old former Anaheim police officer, was cited by the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department’s Special Investigations Bureau at his Rising Sun Road home at 3:20 a.m. on Jan. 14. The citations are misdemeanors. Southern California Edison is participating in the investigation, SCE spokeswoman Taelor Bakewell said. She didn’t have any further details. Marijuana growers sometimes illegally tap into electricity sources. Solar panels cover the roof of Nolan’s home. Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.

California regulators say cannabis billboards along interstate highways must come down

Cannabis businesses can no longer advertise on billboards anywhere along a highway that crosses state borders, after a judge ruled in a favor of a central California dad who sued to block such ads. The ruling won’t impact stretches of in-state freeways populated with marijuana billboards, such as the 55 in Orange County or the 215 in the Inland Empire. But the Bureau of Cannabis Control said Thursday that billboard companies must immediately stop selling space to marijuana shops and start taking down existing ads near roadways that at any point cross state borders. This will mean no cannabis billboards near heavily used freeways such as Interstate 10 in the Inland Empire, the 5 freeway in Orange County, and Highway 101 in Los Angeles. Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.

Marijuana: 4 things to watch for in California in 2021

Making predictions about California’s marijuana industry was a challenge even before a global pandemic changed everything. It’s not just that the legal cannabis market, which launched three years ago in California, is so new. It’s also the singularity of an industry in which licensed, legal operators still compete against a much larger illicit market, even as the industry’s core consumer product — which is medicine for some people — remains illegal at the federal level. Some of the trends that were expected to shake up California’s marijuana industry at the start of 2020 were overshadowed or fully sidelined by the coronavirus. Still, California’s marijuana businesses fared better than some other sectors thanks to their “essential” designation, which allowed retailers and others in the supp...

California cannabis businesses weathered 2020 better than many industries, but challenges persist

No one would say Year Three was the charm for California’s legal cannabis businesses, as many in the industry spent 2020 struggling with a global pandemic, high tax rates and illegal competitors that the state just can’t stamp out. But marijuana businesses are faring better this year than some other sectors thanks to their “essential” designation, which allows retailers and others in the supply chain to stay open during lockdowns. Some also believe the “essential” label is providing an image boost for an industry that’s long been stigmatized. “I think it shows a real cultural shift in how cannabis is being viewed,” said Josh Drayton, spokesman for the Sacramento-based California Cannabis Industry Association trade group. Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.

Orange County’s Democratic leaders celebrate historic House vote to decriminalize marijuana

Published: Dec 4, 2020, 6:04 pm • Updated: Dec 4, 2020, 6:05 pm By Brooke Staggs Orange County’s all-Democratic congressional leadership celebrated Friday after the House approved a bill to decriminalize and tax cannabis at the federal level. The vote, they believe, reverses what supporters describe as a failed policy of criminalizing marijuana consumption, and it takes steps to address racial disparities in enforcement of federal drug laws. “Decriminalizing marijuana at the federal level is long overdue,” said Rep. Harley Rouda, D-Laguna Beach. Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.

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