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Colorado’s first cannabis “bar” with THC beer opens this week in Denver

Coloradans will soon have a bar where they can belly up to enjoy a non-alcoholic, THC-infused beer and order a gram of marijuana served with a side of rolling papers. JAD’s Mile High Smoke is poised to be the first recreational sales and hospitality business in the state, a formal title meaning a lounge where consumers can come to buy weed and smoke, eat or drink it onsite. The business, located at 7667 Washington St. in Denver, is slated for an April 22 opening. Owner Josh Davis said he’s an appropriate person to open this first-of-its-kind business. As founder and CEO of Legacy 64, he’s spent five years helping other marijuana businesses in Colorado and beyond ensure they’re in compliance with state and local laws. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

10 new-ish cannabis terms every Colorado stoner should know, from adult-use to solvent-free

In 2014, The Cannabist, a subsidiary of The Denver Post, published a robust glossary of need-to-know marijuana terms like flower and dabbing to help ease local consumers into the newly legal recreational market. Since then, times have dramatically changed. You can buy edibles not just for getting high, but also for fitness and sleep aid. Cannabis “bars” where tokers can legally consume joints and THC-infused beers are on the precipice of opening. You can even score pre-made cannabutter and infused olive oil to stock your kitchen. As times have changed, so too has the vernacular. Here are 10 more recently adopted terms you should know. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Colorado marijuana industry regulators under fire as underage sales checks nosedive

On about 600 occasions in 2019, state marijuana industry regulators sent hired operatives, aged 18 to 20, into Colorado dispensaries to check that the law barring sales to people under 21 was being followed. Then the COVID-19 pandemic hit, and in 2020 state regulators reported only 118 of those checks. Last year, the number dropped to 80. This year, the Marijuana Enforcement Division says it’s on pace for 52 checks, having completed 14 through March. The reported compliance rate was above 95% each year, but some state lawmakers say the drop-off in total checks is alarming — and they told the division’s leaders that directly in a state Senate committee hearing late last month. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Free marijuana grow tour, cannabis pairing dinners and more stoner fun in Denver

Published: Mar 14, 2022, 12:54 pm • Updated: Mar 14, 2022, 1:19 pm By Tiney Ricciardi Denver locals and visitors know it’s not difficult to find a dispensary where they can purchase weed, though there are far fewer places at which to enjoy it. While businesses like Tetra Lounge, The Coffee Joint and soon the Patterson Inn offer folks 21 and up a space where they can indulge, there are a few other ways around town to experience the cannabis culture. Here are three elevated experiences to try in Denver. Kevin Mohatt, Special to The Denver Post Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Ticker: Pot taxes outpace booze in Massachusetts; Weber Grills apologizes for ill-timed meatloaf recipe

Excise taxes for marijuana sold for adult recreational use exceeded alcohol excise taxes for the first time in Massachusetts, reflecting growing marijuana sales that reached $2.54 billion, according to the Cannabis Control Commission. Massachusetts collected $74.2 million in marijuana excise tax through December 2021 — halfway through the fiscal year — compared to $51.3 million in alcohol excise taxes, WCVB-TV reported. The excise tax of 10.75% on recreational cannabis is part of the total tax revenue. There is also a 6.25% state sales tax, plus a local tax of up to 3%. It all added up to $208 million in total tax revenue last fiscal year. Read the rest of this story on BostonHerald.com.

Pot cafes could soon be coming to Massachusetts

Back in 2016, Massachusetts voters approved a ballot measure that would allow the option for municipalities to bring marijuana cafes, or “social consumption sites,” to town, where people can gather and use cannabis together, Amsterdam-style. Now, over half a decade later, a legislative move has inched the state closer to making them a reality. “The intent of the initiative that was passed by voters was to allow these, dependent upon the vote of the people of a community,” said Jim Borghesani, spokesperson for the 2016 ballot question to bring recreational marijuana to Massachusetts, and a consultant for the cannabis industry. “The legislation is effective in giving towns that voice that they need to determine if they want these or not.” The cafes have not begun popping up in the Bay State ...

Colorado marijuana company to expand into Africa through Tanzanian medical clinics

A Colorado marijuana company with global ambitions aims to expand into Tanzania, with the goal of eventually breaking into the European market. Oak Creek’s Honest Marijuana Company, which specializes in organic marijuana, is partnering with a new chain of medical clinics in Tanzania to set up an African base for medical marijuana production and sales. While cannabis production is outlawed in the East African country, the plant is still cultivated, company Empower Africa reports. Should the Tanzanian government decide to ease its laws around medical marijuana in the future, it would follow a trend growing across the continent, with Lesotho, South Africa, and other nations permitting select cannabis ventures. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Colorado sets record with $2.22 billion in marijuana sales last year

Colorado’s marijuana industry can celebrate 2021 as a record-breaking year with over $2.22 billion in sales. The new milestone follows a trend that’s grown since marijuana sales started in January 2014. Each calendar year has welcomed higher numbers, with the latest bar set in 2020 at over $2.19 billion, the state’s Revenue Department reports. “We’ve hit a record each year since sales began,” said Shannon Gray, marijuana communications specialist at the department’s Marijuana Enforcement Division. Thursday’s announcement “isn’t really out of the ordinary, but more notable that we continue year after year to see an increase.” Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Colorado marijuana companies take a hit from global supply-chain issues

Colorado’s marijuana companies aren’t immune to the supply chain disruptions testing industries worldwide, with some feeling the squeeze on packaging, nutrients and more. “Cannabis is no different than any other industry,” said Matt Jacobs, vice president of operations at Veritas Fine Cannabis. “We’ve got the same issues that other people do when it comes to the supply chain right now.” The coronavirus pandemic thrust the global supply chain into disarray, with overloaded warehouses, backlogged ports and labor shortages intensifying shipping delays. And the U.S. inflation rate continues to rise after hitting a 40-year high in December, the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Consumer Price Index reports. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Colorado offers cannabis entrepreneurs free business education through a new program

Colorado’s cannabis entrepreneurs can look forward to a new technical assistance program aimed at providing education on business development within the industry. The Cannabis Business Office, which announced the program Monday, plans to partner on the initiative with Make Green Go!, a firm that offers business development services to marginalized communities. The free program will provide participants with self-paced learning curriculum, such as videos and coursework, to develop business plans, pitches, and marketing materials, along with other elements. “As the first state where voters supported legalizing the recreational use of cannabis, Colorado is a leader on programs, research and education that continue to create jobs and opportunities in the cannabis industry,” said Gov. Jared Pol...

Colorado’s cannabis industry makes modest gains in minority ownership

Almost 17% of regulated marijuana business owners in Colorado identify as minorities, according to new data by the Colorado Marijuana Enforcement Division, but one Black entrepreneur contests that there’s much more work to be done. “Cannabis ownership in Colorado is still a pipe dream for people of color,” said Wanda James, founder and CEO of Denver’s Simply Pure Dispensary, which was the state’s first Black-owned cannabis dispensary. “When I say people of color, I mean Black and Latino bases that were harmed by the drug war.” The new licensee demographic data for this month, which was reported as of Jan. 1, confirmed that the office surpassed its goal to boost minority-ownership of marijuana businesses to 16.8% by June 30. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Three in four California cannabis companies aren’t licensed; $100 million might help

Nearly four years after California started regulating its cannabis industry, three in four businesses still operate on provisional licenses. As temporary license holders, 75% of the state’s cannabis industry lacks protections and privileges that come with holding full licenses — a situation that worries some in the business. Those temporary operators also haven’t passed extensive environmental reviews required of full licensing — a fact that concerns environmental groups. Cannabis licensing is slow for a number of reasons, ranging from the sometimes dizzying complexity of California’s environmental rules to conflicting language between state and local cannabis laws to the high costs for permits and a shortage of government workers needed to process the paperwork. Read the rest of this stor...