Cannabis Product and Services Reviews - Trusted leaves
Growing Elite Marijuana

Politics

California passes $1 billion in cannabis tax revenue two years after launching legal market

California has raised $1 billion in cannabis tax revenue since the industry kicked into gear in January 2018, according to figures recently released by the state. The bulk of that $1.03 billion in tax money, after covering regulatory costs, has been spent on programs such as child care for low income families, cannabis research, public safety grants and cleaning up public lands harmed by illegal marijuana grows. While industry insiders and advocates are celebrating those numbers, they’re also raising a flag about stagnating revenues and ongoing layoffs. Those hurdles, many say, can be fixed if regulators make key changes, including a seemingly counter intuitive push to lower the state’s cannabis tax rate. Read the rest of this story on MercuryNews.com.

More than 80% of Denver teens say they don’t use marijuana

Published: Feb 26, 2020, 6:15 am • Updated: Feb 26, 2020, 6:17 am By Tiney Ricciardi The majority of teenagers living in Denver are not using marijuana, according to new survey data compiled by the city. Of the teens who do, the number of daily users has increased slightly. City officials surveyed 537 teens in Denver in 2019 to assess the effectiveness of the High Costs youth marijuana prevention program and released the results Wednesday. Of survey respondents ages 13 to 17, 81% said they do not currently use marijuana. The survey included 18-year-olds for the first time and found 61% of them do not currently use marijuana. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Colorado won’t stop employers from firing workers for using weed off the clock

Colorado legislators decided Wednesday not to advance a bill that aimed to protect employees from being fired for using marijuana in their personal time. The 10 members of the House Business Affairs and Labor Committee voted unanimously against the bill, HB 20-1089, after nearly three hours of testimony from people on each side. Though the bill would have done nothing to prohibit employers from administering drug tests, many committee members cited the lack of an adequate test to determine whether an employee is intoxicated in the moment — much like a breathalyzer does for alcohol — as a reason to table it. Others thought the proposed change to the law was too broad. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Marijuana banking bill gets pushback from Colorado’s Buck, Lamborn

Twelve members of the U.S. House of Representatives, including two from Colorado, are publicly pushing back against a federal bill that would give legal cannabis businesses access to banking services. Craig F. Walker , The Denver PostU.S. Rep. Ken Buck in 2014 (Denver Post file) In a Feb. 13 letter sent to Mike Crapo, chairman of the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs, Reps. Ken Buck, R-Windsor, Doug Lamborn, R-Colorado Springs, and 10 other Republican representatives applauded the chairman’s concerns about the Secure and Fair Enforcement (SAFE) Banking Act and urged him to “stand strong” in his assessment of the risks posed by allowing dispensaries, cultivations and other businesses access to the federal banking system. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

State cannabis regulations remain complex, but growers steadily becoming compliant

Save for a few adjustments in state laws, a cannabis permitting workshop in Fortuna on Wednesday carried out in exactly the same way as another workshop 18 months prior — each serving as an effective how-to on becoming legally compliant with California’s pot regulations. But for state officials walking attendees through the ins and outs of state policies, there’s one evident distinction between past and present workshops: whereas an August 2018 event packed the River Lodge with 100 growers and consultants, only about 15 people showed up to Wednesday’s occasion. Janice Mackey, a public information manager for the state Department of Fish and Wildlife, said the decline in attendance signals good news that more and more cannabis growers are coming into compliance with California’s legal syste...

California marijuana regulations remain complex, but growers steadily becoming compliant

FORTUNA– Save for a few adjustments in state laws, a cannabis permitting workshop in Fortuna on Wednesday carried out in exactly the same way as another workshop 18 months prior — each serving as an effective how-to on becoming legally compliant with California’s pot regulations. But for state officials walking attendees through the ins and outs of state policies, there’s one evident distinction between past and present workshops: whereas an August 2018 event packed the River Lodge with 100 growers and consultants, only about 15 people showed up to Wednesday’s occasion. Janice Mackey, a public information manager for the state Department of Fish and Wildlife, said the decline in attendance signals good news that more and more cannabis growers are coming into compliance with California’s le...

Movement to decriminalize ‘magic mushrooms’ gains steam

SANTA CRUZ —  At first glance, it looked like an ordinary gardening workshop. On a table at the front of the room sat soil additives, humidity detectors and an oyster mushroom the size of a grapefruit. “This is a younger shiitake mycelium,” said instructor Will Goss, passing around a bag of wood chips covered in thin white filaments. He then described how to grow the rootlike mycelium from spores and coax it into producing mushrooms. All of the people who attended the workshop were provided with their own grow kits, but they were told they needed to find their own spores. That’s because they weren’t learning how to grow shiitakes. They were finding out how to cultivate psychedelic mushrooms —  illegal to possess under state and federal laws. Read the rest of this story on MercuryNews.com.

Pro-pot Christian sect boards Trump train

Rev. Anne Armstrong is as surprised as anyone that she’s ended up at a Trump rally, but the clergywoman from the small pro-pot Christian sect is just rolling with it. “We wanted to thank the president — he’s been so great in protecting our religious freedoms,” said Armstrong, who attended Monday’s Trump rally with Rev. Alan Gordon, both in smocks featuring a large image of the Virgin Mary and each wielding a large ram’s horn. Armstrong, fixing the pot-leaf bandanna on her head, noted that she was wearing a Wonder Woman costume underneath her smock, and said The Healing Church of Rhode Island has gotten in trouble with the law before over pot. The small church has made headlines in the past when members insisted that marijuana is a “holy herb” featured in various old religious practices. Re...

Editorial: Roll back California pot taxes to save legal market

Published: Feb 3, 2020, 1:26 pm • Updated: Feb 3, 2020, 1:27 pm By Mercury News & East Bay Times Editorial Boards California’s legal marijuana industry has been a bust, falling far short of the sales projected when voters legalized it in 2016. With the approval of Proposition 64, Californians made clear that they wanted to end the farce of criminalizing marijuana-related offenses, and they wanted to allow a legal market for recreational marijuana to operate. Unfortunately, high taxes, a slow-moving permitting process and local government resistance has stifled the ability of the legal market to better get off the ground.

Irvine’s Weedmaps delists 2,700 rogue marijuana stores, but bad actors find loopholes

Facing massive fines from state regulators, Irvine-based Weedmaps has taken major strides toward fulfilling its pledge to drop ads for illicit cannabis shops from its online directory, cutting about 2,700 rogue stores from its site since the start of this year. The company’s long-awaited move to follow state law is drawing praise from legal cannabis operators. Some licensed stores have seen an uptick in business since Jan. 1, a trend they attribute to Weedmaps making it more difficult for potential customers to find unlicensed competitors. But Weedmaps’ new filtering system hasn’t prevented all unlicensed operators from advertising on the site, and many in the regulated market are hoping for even more diligent screening by the prominent, industry-driving platform. Read the rest of this sto...

Did California city break its own laws scoring marijuana dispensary applications?

While Pasadena’s most prominent retail cannabis controversies have centered on technical details and surprise application requirements for the city’s top six applicants, a more fundamental question is making its way through the courts: Did the city abide by its own procedures when choosing the best contenders? Instead of using three scorers — each meant to independently judge a single application and provide three separate scores that would later be totaled and averaged, per city law — documents from a city consultant indicate only one person scored each application. Critics, including two City Council members, say the requirement was meant to insulate the city’s cannabis application process from undue biases and disproportionate influence from a single person; losing that safeguard may ha...

Newsom’s budget calls for changing how California regulates its cannabis industry

Gov. Gavin Newsom is recommending a major overhaul to how California regulates its multibillion-dollar cannabis industry, with changes aimed at streamlining oversight and tax collection included in the proposed state budget he released Friday morning. Industry leaders are applauding the proposals, which are expected to ultimately make things easier for licensed businesses to navigate the legal market and compete with illicit operators. “Today’s announcement from the governor marks a turning of the tide,” said Jerred Kiloh, board president for the Los Angeles-based United Cannabis Business Association trade group. Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.