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A Colorado Democrat wants to cap THC levels in marijuana products at 15%

The lone medical doctor in the Colorado legislature is looking to cut back the THC content on the most potent cannabis products, among other changes that would have major impacts on the state’s cannabis industry. State Rep. Yadira Caraveo, a pediatrician and Thornton Democrat, said she is still revising the bill she plans to introduce this month, but one of the main provisions would ban legal marijuana products above 15% THC — the psychoactive compound responsible for the marijuana high. The ban would apply to flower and edibles. THC in flower products can top off close to 30%, while concentrates generally run at 70-80%. “Even if it’s the start of a conversation, I think it’s an important conversation,” Caraveo told The Denver Post on Thursday. “We led the way with legalization, but it doe...

Cannabis industry may finally move past cash as Democrats look to loosen banking restrictions

Colorado’s cannabis industry has been forced to deal primarily in cash for years due to banking restrictions that pot advocates and banking lobbyists say put shops, growers and others at risk of theft. The industry is now cautiously optimistic this year that, with Democrats in power in Washington, its eight years of trying to lift those restrictions on banks and credit unions will pay off. Because marijuana remains an illicit drug under federal law — and banking the proceeds of illicit drug sales is a federal crime — credit unions and banks are limited in their ability to work with cannabis companies, and take risks when doing so. As a result, the large and growing marijuana industry still remains cash-only, seven years after legalization in Colorado. “We’ve got people who are still dealin...

Majoring in marijuana? That soon could be common as universities adapt to a growth industry.

Published: Feb 1, 2021, 11:52 am • Updated: Feb 1, 2021, 11:55 am By Brooke Staggs Want practical experience growing marijuana, but have no idea how to get a plant? Or just not comfortable growing cannabis at home? Try stinging nettle, which is a plant that’s distantly related to cannabis and has similar growth patterns. That’s just one of many workarounds Dana Milstein had to learn as she developed curriculum for UC Riverside’s new extension program focused on cannabis, which is the first program of its kind at a public university in California. Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.

Molson Coors launches CBD sparkling water exclusively in Colorado

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This rapper and singer is using music to promote the cannabis business

When musicians make it big in the industry, one of the first things many do is quit their day jobs. But aspiring rapper and singer Robert Ellis IV, a Redlands native who now performs as Pullupnsplash, got into music industry to promote his day job in marketing and as an independent consultant for several dispensaries and cannabis brands. “Being in the cannabis industry we’re scrutinized, we don’t really have a way to fairly get our voice out. We’re very regulated as far as marketing, so I had to think outside the box and use music as my freedom of speech, and they can’t take that away,” Ellis said. Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.

Plaintiffs drop suit over marijuana delivery rules

Stung by an exodus of members since it filed suit to block new cannabis industry rules permitting home delivery, the business group that represents most of the state’s brick-and-mortar marijuana shops announced Monday morning that it is dropping the legal challenge. The Commonwealth Dispensary Association and its attorneys from Foley Hoag had argued in the suit that new delivery-only license types created by the Cannabis Control Commission violated the state’s marijuana law, which they said gives the retailers the right to deliver cannabis under their existing licenses. The lawsuit was seen by some as an attack on the disadvantaged entrepreneurs and small businesses that the CCC’s new delivery model was intended to help and a number of retailers publicly broke from the CDA as news of the s...

Former Corona City Councilman Nolan accused of marijuana violations

Former Corona City Councilman Steve Nolan has been cited on suspicion of illegal cultivation of marijuana and possession of marijuana for sale, the Riverside County jail log shows. Nolan, a 58-year-old former Anaheim police officer, was cited by the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department’s Special Investigations Bureau at his Rising Sun Road home at 3:20 a.m. on Jan. 14. The citations are misdemeanors. Southern California Edison is participating in the investigation, SCE spokeswoman Taelor Bakewell said. She didn’t have any further details. Marijuana growers sometimes illegally tap into electricity sources. Solar panels cover the roof of Nolan’s home. Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.

California regulators say cannabis billboards along interstate highways must come down

Cannabis businesses can no longer advertise on billboards anywhere along a highway that crosses state borders, after a judge ruled in a favor of a central California dad who sued to block such ads. The ruling won’t impact stretches of in-state freeways populated with marijuana billboards, such as the 55 in Orange County or the 215 in the Inland Empire. But the Bureau of Cannabis Control said Thursday that billboard companies must immediately stop selling space to marijuana shops and start taking down existing ads near roadways that at any point cross state borders. This will mean no cannabis billboards near heavily used freeways such as Interstate 10 in the Inland Empire, the 5 freeway in Orange County, and Highway 101 in Los Angeles. Read the rest of this story on ocregister.com.

November marijuana sales push Colorado’s industry to $2 billion annually for the first time

Colorado marijuana sales in November pushed the industry’s annual revenue to $2 billion for the first time. In November, dispensaries sold $175.1 million worth of products, according to figures released by the Department of Revenue on Tuesday. Recreational sales accounted for about $140.5 million, while medical sales accounted for nearly $34.7 million, the agency reported. While the total is down about 12% compared to the month prior, it was enough to help Colorado hit yet another financial milestone in an already banner year for cannabis. From January through November 2020, consumers purchased slightly more than $2 billion, the Department of Revenue reported. The previous year, dispensaries reached $1.75 billion in annual sales, a record at the time. Read the rest of this story on DenverP...

Marijuana delivery, social equity reform and other Colorado cannabis trends to watch in 2021

Colorado’s marijuana industry experienced a banner year in 2020 — not in spite of the COVID-19 pandemic, but because of it. Dispensaries across the state were declared essential businesses and allowed to operate while bars, restaurants and gyms were forced to close. That designation helped sales exceed analysts’ expectations. According to Roy Bingham, co-founder and executive chairman of Boulder data firm BSDA, the national market grew more than 45% to $18 billion in 2020, outpacing forecasts by about $2 billion, an increase attributable to “the COVID effect.” Cannabis consumers shopped less frequently but purchased more, including many newcomers with increased at-home time on their hands, he said. Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.

Marijuana: 4 things to watch for in California in 2021

Making predictions about California’s marijuana industry was a challenge even before a global pandemic changed everything. It’s not just that the legal cannabis market, which launched three years ago in California, is so new. It’s also the singularity of an industry in which licensed, legal operators still compete against a much larger illicit market, even as the industry’s core consumer product — which is medicine for some people — remains illegal at the federal level. Some of the trends that were expected to shake up California’s marijuana industry at the start of 2020 were overshadowed or fully sidelined by the coronavirus. Still, California’s marijuana businesses fared better than some other sectors thanks to their “essential” designation, which allowed retailers and others in the supp...

Western fashion, cannabis and plant love: Colorado trends that went big in 2020

An edition of The Denver Post. All contents Copyright © 2020 The Denver Post or other copyright holders | Powered by WordPress. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed for any commercial purpose.